Point Lookout Lighthouse

Historical Lighthouse Pictures


AnnDavisHallway.jpg
361 viewsA visitor to the Lighthouse reported seeing a woman dressed in a long blue dress at this location (the top of the stairs). The visitor had the impression this was Ann Davis, the first female lighthousekeeper who was alone here for thirty years. One of Hans Holzer's investigators stated that a woman haunted these stairs and this woman had often thought about throwing herself down the staircase. (Note: this staircase did not exist during the time that Ann Davis lived in the lighthouse; the staircase was added as part of the 1927 remodel).
attic.jpg
Wooden Beams in Lighthouse Attic369 viewsSeveral dormer windows gave this room some natural light. This is a typical-looking attic filled with wires, debris and insulation. Several people have reported finding items in the attic - one reportedly found a Lighthouse Keepers hat. At the time this picture was taken, racoons had taken residence in the attic and at times and the stench of animal waste would be overpowering. The most recent remodel removed the waste and has restricted access to the animals.

basement.jpg
Small light in basement370 viewsWhile photographing in the basement, this unusual light appeared in the photo in the door frame. The light appears to shine downward and outward at the same time. This could be a reflection on the water heater from the flash, but the shape seems very odd for a flash reflection.

Basement1.jpg
280 viewsSouth Side Basement, middle room.
freshwatertower.jpg
Freshwater Storage Container, Attic342 viewsThis storage container was used by the lighthouse keepers to gather and store fresh water for drinking purposes. Vandals have removed the copper lining which was still intact as recently as 1981. The wood housing is still in excellent shape.

furnace.jpg
403 viewsThe furnace is located in the northwest side basement room. A retaining wall was built around the furnace to protect it from the frequent flooding that occurs at the Point. The rusty old furnace was not old or rusty as recently as 1981, when it was in good working order. Heating a twelve room house required a lot of expensive oil. Residents have reported that the house was pretty warm in the winter due to the 14-inch thick walls. However, the 500 gallon oil tank always needed refilling and was quite expensive during the oil crisis in the early 80's.

fusebox.jpg
423 viewsThis picture shows the fuse box located in the basement. The fuses blew frequently and Laura had to go to the basement in complete darkness to change the fuses. This is the only room where she did not feel comfortable entering; unfortunately she had to go to the basement all the time to replace blown fuses. Point Lookout State Park personnel used the basement for storage. The fusebox wall contains two windows that look out to the Chesapeake Bay (the windows are located underneath the porch). To the right of the blue fusebox, you can see a portion of the original brick wall exposed by the crumbling cement; the original walls were covered by cement during a previous renovation.

incupula.jpg
Fresnel Lens Stand393 viewsThis is the actual light housing located up in the tower/cupola. The light was originally operated with oil, until it was electrified in the 1920s, first by a windmill and later by generators and commercial power. Hans Holzer's group visited here and recorded a voice in this area that said: "My Home".
kitchen.jpg
Kitchen470 viewsThis room is used as the entrance to the Lighthouse. Many of the cabinets have been removed, however, the stove and sink fixtures still remain in fairly good shape.
kitchen2.jpg
406 viewsThis is a unique built-in cabinet next to a storage closet in the South side of the Lighthouse, and one of the few differences between the north and south sides of the lighthouse. The custom cabinets were built by Keeper Herman Metivier. It has been this coral color since at least 1979.
KitVent.jpg
South Side Kitchen437 viewsA screened vent in the kitchen window. The Navy installed the vents as an interim measure to allow air circulation within the lighthouse to prevent moisture and mold from building up inside. This window vent was put in place by the Navy as part of the effort to put the lighthouse in a "mothball" state to prevent any further damage and to keep it structurally sound. The vent was replaced in the 2002 remodel.

ladder.jpg
408 viewsAfter climbing the spiral stairs, you reach a landing which contains this ladder. At the top of the ladder is a hatch which you push open and climb into the Lighthouse Tower. Point Lookout Lighthouse is an integral lighthouse, meaning that the tower is attached to the roof of the lighthouse, as opposed to having a seperate structure.
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